As well made and robust as most hearing aids are, they are not indestructible. There are always things that can go wrong, and if you are a long-term user of hearing aids, it is inevitable that at some point, you are going to experience an issue that needs repairing.

Some repairs are going to be easy, while others are naturally going to be more complicated. It is important to know some of the things that will need repairing so that you know whether you need to take them to your audiologist. Here, we look at some of the most common hearing aid repairs.

Broken Microphones

If there are noticeable issues with the sound produced by your hearing aids, it may be that there is a problem with the microphone which needs looking at. If you are not receiving the same quality or level of sound that you are used to getting, get in touch with your audiologist who will be able to investigate whether the microphone needs repairing. Many people mistake it for a further deterioration of their hearing, but this can be ruled out by checking in with your audiologist. It is a fairly complex thing to fix, so will typically be sent off to the manufacturer for repair.

Problems with the Tubing

The tubing connects the device to the earmold and carries sound into the ear canal from behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids. The tubing can harden, crack and stretch out of shape, as well as degrade and discolor over time because of exposure to moisture, debris and simply through age. It will need to be replaced every so often because of this, which is usually an easy fix. 

Degradation of the Earmolds

The earmold is the part of your hearing aid that sits in your ear. It will, like most things, wear down with age and lose its shape. When this happens, it will no longer fit in your ear comfortably and can cause skin irritation. If this happens, you can have a new earmold made, which is based on the casts of your ear. It is a relatively quick and easy repair, especially if your audiologist already has casts of your ear.

Damaged Earhooks

The earhook of a hearing aid is a little part of an in-the-ear (ITE) device that fits snugly around the ear and helps to keep the hearing aid in place. Because it protrudes from the device, it is not unusual for it to be twisted or snapped if it is trodden on or laid on. Although you can sometimes bend it back into place or glue the two broken pieces together, this is a simple and inexpensive fix that your audiologist can do properly.

Problems Caused by Moisture

You should be advised not to expose your hearing aid to moisture unless it is waterproof. Some minor issues caused by moisture, such as damaged hearing tubes can be easily repaired by an audiologist. However, if the electrical components inside have been affected, they can be more complex and will need repairing by the manufacturers.

As well made and robust as most hearing aids are, they are not indestructible. There are always things that can go wrong, and if you are a long-term user of hearing aids, it is inevitable that at some point, you are going to experience an issue that needs repairing.

Some repairs are going to be easy, while others are naturally going to be more complicated. It is important to know some of the things that will need repairing so that you know whether you need to take them to your audiologist. Here, we look at some of the most common hearing aid repairs.

Broken Microphones

If there are noticeable issues with the sound produced by your hearing aids, it may be that there is a problem with the microphone which needs looking at. If you are not receiving the same quality or level of sound that you are used to getting, get in touch with your audiologist who will be able to investigate whether the microphone needs repairing. Many people mistake it for a further deterioration of their hearing, but this can be ruled out by checking in with your audiologist. It is a fairly complex thing to fix, so will typically be sent off to the manufacturer for repair.

Problems with the Tubing

The tubing connects the device to the earmold and carries sound into the ear canal from behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids. The tubing can harden, crack and stretch out of shape, as well as degrade and discolor over time because of exposure to moisture, debris and simply through age. It will need to be replaced every so often because of this, which is usually an easy fix. 

Degradation of the Earmolds

The earmold is the part of your hearing aid that sits in your ear. It will, like most things, wear down with age and lose its shape. When this happens, it will no longer fit in your ear comfortably and can cause skin irritation. If this happens, you can have a new earmold made, which is based on the casts of your ear. It is a relatively quick and easy repair, especially if your audiologist already has casts of your ear.

Damaged Earhooks

The earhook of a hearing aid is a little part of an in-the-ear (ITE) device that fits snugly around the ear and helps to keep the hearing aid in place. Because it protrudes from the device, it is not unusual for it to be twisted or snapped if it is trodden on or laid on. Although you can sometimes bend it back into place or glue the two broken pieces together, this is a simple and inexpensive fix that your audiologist can do properly.

Problems Caused by Moisture

You should be advised not to expose your hearing aid to moisture unless it is waterproof. Some minor issues caused by moisture, such as damaged hearing tubes can be easily repaired by an audiologist. However, if the electrical components inside have been affected, they can be more complex and will need repairing by the manufacturers.